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A Day Trip to Newark

As I sit here checking on a couple comments left on this little blog, I realize that I haven’t written a post in almost three months!  You all probably think I haven’t found any new Sears Houses recently.

Not so!

I did take a little break from research over the Holidays,  but since then I have located  houses here and there, all from my desktop PC in my warm home office.  Hey!  It’s Winter in Ohio.  And while we are having a mild Winter in my part of the State, the lack of sun, and daylight, makes driving around not that much fun.

But recently we did have a day when the sun was shining, so hubby, Frank, and I hopped into the car and took a ride.

We decided to head to Newark, a place we’ve been meaning to visit, but hadn’t gotten around to yet.  Mostly because we wanted to see the Louis Sullivan designed Home Building Association Bank.

Home Building Association Bank

But you know what happens when I go someplace new!  I always try to make a little time to look for Sears Houses.   We already had a couple houses in Newark on our Master List, and I wanted to drive by those as well.

We got kind of a late start, so we didn’t get to Newark until just before lunchtime.  We headed downtown first, as that is where the bank building was located.  And since The Licking County Recorder’s Office was there as well,  I could to do a quick check for mortgage records.  That is one of the ways serious researchers locate homes purchased as kits through Sears, Roebuck.

As happens often, the employee at the desk wasn’t sure if they had mortgage index books available for the 1920’s and 1930’s, as that isn’t a thing normal people ask for.  But as also happens often, some random person who does Title searches for a living, heard our conversation and showed us where they were.

I didn’t find a lot of mortgages, 10 total, but from those I was able to track down a couple more Sears Houses, and document two that we already knew about.

After a quick lunch, we headed out for a drive around town so I could get a few photos.

Here’s one we already knew about, from an owner, I think, but is now documented with a mortgage record.

Sears Maplewood 426 Cedarcrest Ave Newark OH left (EHP)

Sears Maplewood, 426 Cedarcrest Ave., Newark OH

Sears Maplewood image 1931

 

By the way, that decorative iron piece on the chimney is not an “S” for Sears.  It was a common design feature used at the time, and is found on many homes NOT from Sears.

Here’s the house straight on from the front.  The Maplewood house design was also pretty common, and as there were many homes built around the same time that looked like it, that were not from Sears, it is good to have photos of a documented one for comparison.  The slope of the “catslide” and where it stops and starts along the main body of the house are details we review when checking houses we spot on street surveys.

Sears Maplewood 426 Cedarcrest Ave Newark OH (EHP)

Sears Maplewood, 426 Cedarcrest Ave., Newark OH

 

Here’s the other house we already had on our list in Newark.  I didn’t find a mortgage record for this one, so we still don’t consider it documented.  Additional information from the owner, or an inside inspection would be needed for that.

Sears Avalon 248 Goosepond Rd Newark OH

Sears Avalon, 248 Goosepond Rd., Newark OH

 

Avalon image 1921

The house has had some exterior updates, which removed some of the architectural details, but it looks like the porch rail is original.

Sears Avalon 248 Goosepond Rd Newark OH L

Sears Avalon, 248 Goosepond Rd.,Newark OH

 

Another house that was already on our list, but is now documented with a mortgage record is this one, that I spotted and took photos of way back in 2013.  It’s in Utica, not Newark.  Remember, the mortgages are recorded by county, not city.

 

Sears Barrington 234 N Main St Utica OH L (WOL)

Sears Barrington, 234 N Main St., Utica OH

Sears Barrington 234 N Main St Utica OH R1 (WOL)

Sears Barrington, 124 N Main St., Utica OH

Sears Barrington 1928 image

My funny story about The Barrington in Utica is that my photos of it were in my “lost houses” folder on my PC for quite a while.   I wasn’t very good at labeling my photos when I first started this crazy hobby, and when this one turned up a couple years ago while I was trying to organize them, I had no idea where is was!  I think I figured it out last year.   Now we know it’s the real deal.

One of the houses I located from the mortgage records is in the village of Jacksontown and one is in the village of Johnsontown.   We also know of a possible house in Granville, so Sears Houses were being built all over Licking County.   I’ll bet a thorough in person street survey will turn up more.

Licking County map

Licking County map

 

Oh yeah.  That bank building we wanted to see is undergoing serious restoration so we couldn’t see much.

IMG_0048

Hopefully I will get back to Newark before I look like the ladies in this sculpture downtown.

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Thanks for following along.

 

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A Sears Franklin in Deer Park

Hello there little blog of mine.  I know.  I’ve missed you, too.

Seems like ever since the time changed and darkness has taken over my part of Ohio, I haven’t had the time or energy to go out and about and hunt for Sears Houses.  And now it’s the Holiday Season, which means even less time to do all that needs to be done.

But, there is always that Google car waiting patiently, to take me off on a virtual tour of neighborhoods around the state, and it doesn’t mind if it is dark outside!

A couple of weeks ago, my little research team had a quick discussion about how we had, maybe, exhausted all the on line resources currently available, that would help us track down Sears Houses.  That discussion came up because our smallish Facebook Group had gotten pretty quiet.

So I put on my thinking cap, which is also pretty small, and thought about what could give us a boost.  I spent a bit of time spot checking some of the mortgage records for the Cincinnati area that we weren’t able to attach to a Sears House, but that didn’t go so well.  Had we found all the Sears Houses in Cincinnati?  Nahhhhhh, as Donna Bakke would have said.  Donna had a great eye for Sears Houses, and always said they were “everywhere” in Cincinnati.  She passed on to a better life than this one before telling us where all of them were!

So, more thinking……..

I pulled out Rebecca Hunter’s “Putting Sears Homes on the Map” book, and did a quick skim of Ohio and surrounding states.

Hmmmm….I noticed there were a bunch of addresses for the Sears Argyle model in Anderson, Indiana.  I took a minute to check our “list” and found that they hadn’t been entered yet!  But first, I wanted to “see” them for myself, so I hopped in my Google car and went to Anderson.  Yep, there they were.  At least, most of them.  I added them to the list.  Of course, since I was already there, might as well “drive” around a bit.  Before the night was over, I had located 10 Sears Houses in Anderson that hadn’t already been spotted by another researcher.

After that successful night, I took a quick look at how many houses, total, we had located to date.  On November 11, 2019, we had 11,860.

I then put out a challenge to our team to reach 12,000 houses by the end of the year.  It was less than three houses a day, and I had found ten in one night!  Could we do it?

I found a few more in Anderson, Indiana, then stumbled across some old deed records that led me to several Sears Houses in Albany County, New York.  My team was working through real estate listings, Google driving, following up leads gotten from homeowners, and also spot checking their own files for houses that never made it to the “list”  A few did some walking and driving in their own areas, and before we knew it, we were there!

Where are the Sears Houses – December 2019 Edition

And Ohio still leads the way!

Anyways……what about this Sears Franklin in Deer Park that is the title of this blog post?

While on the hunt to reach our goal, I did eventually go back to my spot checking mortgage records in the Cincinnati area.  One of those records took me to Deer Park, a suburb of Cincinnati.  Deer Park had close to 30 Sears Houses already on the list, so I was already familiar with some of the streets in that small city.  When I did track down the parcel I was looking for, I discovered the house had already been “discovered”.  That happens a LOT in Cincinnati.

Most of the Sears Houses in Deer Park are small models, and most have been well cared for, which is always nice to find.  While I was “there”, I did a Google drive around the block and spotted……what we researchers would call……”something”.  That usually means the house looks familiar, but we can’t quite figure out if it’s a Sears House or not, at first glance.  So we pull out our copy of “Houses by Mail” and check some other on line resources, to see if we can figure it out.

Here’s the Hamilton County Auditor’s photo of the house in Deer Park that I thought was “something”.

Probable Sears Franklin, 3995 Superior Ave., Deer Park, Ohio (Photo from Hamilton County Auditor website)

What I am pretty sure I spotted is the very first Sears Franklin model located to date!

 

The Franklin was one of the tri-level style homes that Sears started offering in the early 1930’s.  The earliest this model was available, we think, was 1934, making it more difficult to locate, since Sears stopped offering mortgages just about the same time. Mortgage records point our noses to lots of Sears Houses we might otherwise miss.

I did what I do…….check the windows and door placement all around……check the chimney placement……check the year of build and dimensions on the County Auditor’s website……

Check…..check…..check.  The house has a dormer which isn’t shown in the catalog, but that could have been added at time of build, or later.  I also noticed that the front door seemed to be a little more to the right than what the catalog image shows.

Then, I noticed that in the floor plan sketch, the door actually is further to the right than what is shown in the catalog image.  We researchers have found that on other models as well.   Sometimes it is because there is more than one floor plan, and sometimes……Sears just didn’t picture the house correctly!

 

The house in Deer Park also has a couple extra windows on the “Foundation” level, but that room was meant to be customized to the owner’s preference.

 

Overall this is a fairly small home.  With only four rooms on the main floor, that lower level would surely be best used as additional living space as opposed to a garage.

Here’s what Sears tells us about the house in the 1936 catalog.

I’m hoping to get to Deer Park soon, so I can see this house “for real”.  In the meantime, I will be Google driving around, maybe in your area, in the hopes of finding “something”.

Thanks for following along.

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A Sears No. 171 in Sidney

The little Facebook page I started several years ago to promote Sears Modern Homes has grown slowly and steadily over time.  Since my research buddy, Judith, took over the Admin duties a while back, it has grown faster and more steadily than when I was managing it!  Thanks to Judith for keeping it going strong.

Thankfully, whenever the page gets an inquiry about a possible Sears House here in Ohio, Judith is quick to let me know.

That’s what happened earlier this month.

After finding a mailing label from Sears, Roebuck on the back of a trim board in his house, the owner, Hank,  got to work doing some research about what that might mean.  It didn’t take him long to figure out that his whole house might have been purchased from Sears!

Hank was pretty sure he had figured out the model from on line resources, but a few things were off.  He contacted the Facebook page to share his findings and was looking for confirmation.  He and Judith exchanged information for a while, and guess what?

He was right!

Here’s his photo of the mailing label that got the whole thing started.

shipping label

Mailing label found on the back of a trim board of a Sears No. 171 near Sidney, Ohio.  (This is not my photo.  Please don’t use it without permission.)

Judith put me in touch with Hank, and shortly after, I was able to go see the house in person.  The house has some great original details, and…….a great story to tell.

The house is what I call an “old style” farmhouse.  You know the kind.  It’s a traditional gabled ell design, and here in Ohio, they are everywhere in our rural areas.  They are so common, in fact, that I never really look at them twice on street surveys.  It is only when something brings a particular property to my attention, that I spend time reviewing it for Sears details.

Here’s the house in Sidney.  We have determined that the house is a model No. 171, which was later known as The Rossville. ( In a few catalogs, Sears expanded the number to what is shown in the images below, the No. 264P171.)

Sears No 171 5997 Cecil Rd Sidney OH

Sears No 171 near Sidney OH

 

Sears No 171 image 1914

As for original details…… the house has this window…..which Hank and Judith had already figured out.  It’s the Bayview Cottage Window.

Sears No 171 Bayview window 5997 Cecil Rd Sidney OH

Bayview Cottage window in a Sears No 171 near Sidney Ohio

It was a little bit challenging, but with help from Trina, Hank’s lovely lady, I was able to get a photo that showed some of the details of the window.

Bayview Cottage Window top sash

Close up of the top sash in the Bayview Cottage Window

Bayview Cottage Window 1912

Bayview Cottage Window from an early Sears Building Materials catalog

The Bayview window is one of two things that made Hank and Judith sure the house was an early Sears model.  The second thing was the door hardware.  If you follow this little blog, you’ve probably seen photo after photo after photo of the common Sears door hardware, the Stratford design.

Yeah…..well…..this house doesn’t have that kind!

Mayfair design hardware 1915 Gen Merch catalog

Sears No 171 Mayfair hardware 5997 Cecil Rd Sidney OH

Mayfair hardware on a Sears No. 171 near Sidney, Ohio

After getting photos of those two distinctive things about this particular house, we got down to the business of reviewing the floor plan, window arrangement, and a few other details.

Hank already knew a lot about his home’s history, but one of the things he wasn’t sure about is the actual year of build.  The Auditor information says the house was built in 1940.  Well……we know that’s not correct….but in this instance there is a reason that this is wrong on the Tax Card.

The place where the house is now…..isn’t where the house was built!

I know!  Crazy!

Hank is sure, from local sources, and his own research, that the house was moved to its current location from another area close by that was owned by the same family as the one that built it.  Apparently, the place where it sits now was the location of a log cabin that burned down somewhere along the way, and the family moved the Sears House there.  It partially sits on the original stone foundation that supported the log cabin previously.

I TOLD you the house had a great story.

Knowing that the house had been moved to its current location gave us some insight into why some things aren’t quite right.  Mainly, the location of the stairs to the basement aren’t where they are shown in the floor plan for the No 171.

Sears No 171 floor plan 1914

Well…….if you picked up a house and moved it, you aren’t going to be taking the stairs to the basement with you!  Especially in this situation, where the house is being put on an existing foundation.  New stairs would have to be be built, and in this instance, they changed that location to better serve the family.  Like….they are inside the house now, instead of outside!

The basement stairs are now beneath the stairs to the second floor, and you enter from the kitchen, where the floor plan shows a closet.  Except for the door being narrow, that is a great place to access the basement.  In the original details, it clearly states that the stairs for the No. 171 were outside the footprint of the house.

Sears No 171 details 1914

 

And that door…..that used to be to the closet……they kept it.  Another original feature of the house.

Sears No 171 5997 Cecil Rd Sidney OH interior door

Interior door on a Sears No. 171 near Sidney Ohio

All the doors in the house are original, as well as most of the trim boards.

Here’s the inside of the door leading from the kitchen to the outside.

Sears No 171 5997 Cecil Rd sidney exterior door

Exterior door on a Sears No. 171 near Sidney Ohio

Metropole Exterior Door 1912

We were able to match up the exterior door design to one also shown in the early Sears Building  Materials catalog.   The house doesn’t have a fancy pane of glass as is shown in the catalog. Maybe it did at one time.  The door does have the little ledges on the part that faces the outside.

While I am sure other companies besides Sears sold doors with this design – one top panel, a large pane of glass, and three panels below, we also found that Sears used the combination of the Metropole door, the five panel interior door, the Bayview Window, and the Mayfair hardware on another early gabled ell design, the No. 115, in 1908, the very first year for Sears Modern Home catalogs!

Pg 8 and 9 - 1908

Thanks to Andrew Mutch for supplying copy of these pages from the 1908 Sears Modern Homes catalog.

Materials for 705 dollar house - 1908

After seeing these details advertised together, maybe we are getting closer to putting a year of build on Hank’s house.

Factoring in the mailing label, we know it can’t be as early as 1908.  The mailing label states that the materials were shipped directly from Norwood, Ohio.  Sears, Roebuck purchased what would be called Norwood Sash and Door in 1912, and the first catalog year that mentioned shipments were made from “Southern Ohio” was 1913.

I did suggest to Hank that maybe only the first floor of the house was completed at time of build.  In the floor plan, there is a bedroom on the first floor, which is now used as the Dining room.  If that was the case, maybe the original owners bought additional materials in 1913, or later, to complete the second floor.

Hank is doing additional research at the County Offices and the Library to try to get a closer year of build.

Here’s a few more pictures of original details.

Sears No 171 5997 Cecil Rd Sidney OH newel post

Newel post and balusters on the Sears No. 171 near Sidney Ohio

Stair newel posts

Sears No 171 5997 Cecil Rd Sidney OH Mayfair hardware 2

Another shot of the Mayfair Hardware

Sears No 171 5997 Cecil Rd Sidney OH doorbell

The doorbell

 

What a great history.  And a great house.  And a great owner.

My thanks to Judith for connecting me with the owner, and of course, my thanks to Hank (and his lovely lady Trina) for sharing the home with me.  And you.

Thanks for following along!

 

 

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Happy Fall!

I love the Fall of the year.  It’s without  a doubt my favorite season.  If you know me personally, you might know that orange is my favorite color, so maybe that’s one of the reasons why Fall appeals to me.

Apparently, my love of Fall must prompt me to get out and about hunting up Sears Houses, because as I was going through my photo files (which aren’t very well organized), I discovered I have a lot of pictures of Sears Houses that are decorated for Fall or Halloween, or have lovely Fall colors in the landscaping.

Now that it has finally cooled off here in Ohio and feels more like Fall, I decided this would be a good time to share some of my photos.   I will post the models, the addresses, and when I took the photo in the captions.

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Harris Bros No 1000, 2126 Heritage Point Dr., Kettering Ohio. Photo taken Nov 6, 2015

Harris Bros No 1000 image 1923

How about this house being a perfect match to the catalog?  Just add a skelelton……

S Alhambra 221 North Shore R South Bend IN

Sears Alhambra, 221 W North Shore Dr., South Bend, IN. Photo taken Nov 1, 2016

Sears Alhambra image 1918

This Sears Kilbourne in Cincinnati was built reversed from the catalog offering.  No problem at time of ordering and no extra charge!

S Kilbourne 601 Rushton Rd CCat Cincinnati OH

Sears Kilbourne, 601 Rushton Rd., Cincinnati Ohio – photo taken Oct 5, 2014

Sears Kilbourne image 1920.jpg

OK so the next one isn’t decorated for Fall, but it’s ORANGE!

S Puritan 412 S 23rd St L Richmond IN

Sears Puritan, 412 S 23rd St., Richmond IN. Photo taken Nov 18, 2018

Puritan image 1925

Nice original details on the front of this Sears Oakdale in Newtown, Ohio.

S Oakdale 6810 Main St R CCat Cincinnati OH

Sears Oakdale, 6810 Main St, Newtown Ohio.   Photo taken Sept 29, 2014

Sears Oakdale image 1925

I got up close to this Sears Attleboro last year when the owners opened their home to the public for a Holiday Craft Sale.   There was a  bit of snow that day, which added a nice touch to the Fall leaves.  Lots of trees on this property, which makes it hard to see from the road.

Sears Attleboro 2904 Dayton Xenia Rd Beavercreek OH

Sears Attleboro, 2904 Dayton Xenia Rd., Beavercreek Ohio. Photo take Nov 16, 2018. 

Sears Attleboro imge on cover 1936 catalog

The Sears Attleboro was featured on the cover of the 1936 and 1938 Modern Homes catalogs.

One of the more unique Sears models, The Carroll.  Also built reversed from the catalog offering.

S Carroll 7230 Fernbank Ave Cincinnati OH 2

Sears Carroll, 7230 Fernbank Ave., Cincinnati Ohio. Photo taken Nov 12, 2018

Sears Carroll image 1931 catalog

You always hear that lot of Sears Houses were built close to the railroad tracks.  Well…….if that wasn’t the case, I guess you could try to bring the railroad tracks close to the house!

S Wilmore 6719 Home City Ave Cincinnati OH

Sears Wilmore (also called The Jewel), 6719 Home City Ave., Cincinnati Ohio. Photo taken Nov 12, 2018

Sears Wilmore image 1936 catalog

Just down the street from the Wilmore is this very well kept Sears Rochelle.

S Rochelle 6818 Home City Ave Cincinnati OH

Sears Rochelle, 6818 Home City Ave., Cincinnati Ohio.  Photo taken Nov 12, 2018

Sears Rochelle image 1930

I could go on and on…….but it’s a nice Fall day in Ohio.  Maybe I should get out there and take some new photos.

Thanks for following along.

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A Sears Osborn in Middletown

I can’t believe it has been over three weeks since my last blog post!  I always intend to do  a post once a week….. then I get busy with real life.

Sometimes I forget I even have a blog!  Then I check my backlog of emails and see that people have left comments, which I haven’t reviewed, and remember…….

Yeah…….I could do better with that.

Anyways, I promised that my next post would be about a house in Middletown that I have had on my “Sears House” radar for quite a while.  I took photos of it a couple of years back, but I wasn’t sold on it since it had a roof line difference from what was offered in the Sears Modern Homes catalogs.

Except for the fact that the house has “clipped” gables and the side porch has been enclosed, it’s a pretty close match to the Sears Osborn.

201 Monroe St Middletown OH (7)

Sears Osborn, 201 Monroe St., Middletown Ohio

osborn-image-1925

Sears House researchers are always a little bit skeptical, maybe too skeptical, about houses that aren’t a “spot on” match to the catalog offering.  Nobody knows better than we do that many, many Sears Houses were either changed a bit at time of ordering, or modified at time of construction.  This has been proven over and over again through our mortgage record and newspaper research.

So why are we still skeptical about houses that don’t match up?  Because just as many times, we find out they AREN’T Sears Houses.

Sigh…….

But now I have it from a descendant of the original owner that this is a Sears House. And I am in no position to argue with that!

Now for the FUN part of this blog post.  Said descendant of the original owner (thanks Cam) sent me vintage photos of the house!

I LOVE that.  And I think you will, too.

69384926_421490221903749_5621728525330415616_n

John Petrocy family Sears Osborn, 201 Monroe St., Middletown Ohio

According to Cam, the granddaughter of the original  owner, John Petrocy was a concrete contractor, and built the house himself.

69232551_484748115691660_1817978868061962240_n

201 Monroe St Middletown OH (8).jpg

Another thing that looks “off” on this house, comparing it to the catalog illustration, is the width of the front door, and the size of the front windows.  I am wondering if maybe those things were changed to save on the cost of the house.  While the Sears Osborn was offered as an “already cut and fitted” model, maybe John Petrocy ordered just the plans and building materials, and cut the lumber himself to save some money.  We may never know…….

69177765_649773935531856_6825091818078601216_n

201 Monroe St Middletown OH (9).jpg

People, it gives me the chills to see that I took photos of this house ( a couple years ago) from the exact same angles as the vintage photos Cam sent me.

Cam also sent me a photo of her Grandfather standing on the front porch.

Petrocy Osbrn ghost

Using the photo above, and my own photo of the house……….well……..maybe I should have saved this post for Halloween.  😉

Petrocy Osborn ghost

It’s even cooler in black and white.

Petrocy Osborn ghost BW

These photos are a treasure, that’s for sure.   It’s not everyday I get old photos of Sears Houses, but I have gotten a bunch this year!

Check back occasionally, as I plan on featuring others in future posts.

Thanks for following along.

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A few “Sears Houses” in Monroe

Monroe, Ohio is a small city just off I-75 between Dayton and Cincinnati.

Up until this year, I knew pretty much nothing about Monroe.  All I ever saw of it was what was on “The Exit”.  You know the one.  Big Buttery Jesus…….Traders World……Premium Outlet Mall……..

Then, this past Spring, I was asked to give a Presentation at a General Meeting of the Monroe Historical Society.  It’s been a while since I have given a “stand still” type of talk, as usually I am guiding folks around neighborhoods here in Springfield on Walking Tours.

But as I had decided to take this year off from the Walking Tour schedule, the timing was perfect for me to freshen up my Power Point Presentation.

So off to Monroe I went, in the Spring, to have a drive around and check out the one house they already knew was a “Sears House”

Or was it?

Lewis San Fernando 110 Macready Monroe OH

Possible Lewis San Fernando, 110 Macready Ave., Monroe OH

Here’s the deal.  “Sears House” has become a generic name used to describe any house purchased as a kit from a mail order catalog.  And since there were other companies that sold houses besides Sears, sometimes a “Sears House” isn’t from Sears, Roebuck.

Some researchers get annoyed about it when a house from another company is referred to as a “Sears House”, but it doesn’t bother me a bit.  I am glad, and thankful, to have the information, and….it helps my research skills to track down models from some of the other companies.

So I’m pretty sure, and so is the family that has owned it for years, that their house is a “Sears House” from Lewis Mfg Co.

San Fernando image

The San Fernando from Lewis Homes – 1924 catalog

According to the family that attended my talk, there are a few things that don’t match up to either of the two floor plans that were offered for this model.  For one thing, the house has access to the attic area via a stairway that is not shown in the catalog.  Adding that stairway might have accounted for the few other small things that are different, like closet locations.  I am hopeful the owners may be able to find some documentation that will determine if the house is, indeed, from Lewis Homes.  We don’t have many Lewis models in our part of Ohio, so I was thrilled to see one in such good repair.

A couple houses down the street is this house, which matches up to a design offered by Montgomery Ward.

WW Monteroy (GVT Gilmore) 142 Macready Monroe OH right

Possible Wardway Monteroy, 142 Macready Ave., Monroe OH

WW Monteroy 1924 image

The house has had vertical siding added, making the identification a little tricky, but what caught my eye is the other side of the house.

WW Monteroy (GVT Gilmore) 142 Macready Monroe OH left

See that little bumped out area?  That’s the bathroom!  The Wardway Monteroy shows that in the catalog illustration of the floor plan.

WW Monteroy 1924 details

Around the corner from these two possible kit houses on Macready Ave., are two more houses that match a design offered by Montgomery Ward.

WW Florence 61 Ohio Ave Monroe OH right (2)

Possible Wardway Florence, 61 Ohio Ave., Monroe OH

The front of the house shows the detail to look for to get started identifying this one, with the front door flanked by half windows.

WW Florence 61 Ohio Ave Monroe OH

WW Florence image 1924

The house on Ohio Ave is reversed from the catalog offering.  That was a common change at order time.

The second house on Ohio Ave is right next door.  It’s the same model, but not as photogenic.  You’ll just have to take my word for it.

So….are there any “real”  Sears Houses in Monroe?

YES!!!

Sears Homecrest 629 Lebanon St Monroe OH

Sears Homecrest, 629 Lebanon St., Monroe OH

 

I have to admit, I would have driven right past this house and not recognized it.  In fact……I did…..several times.  In my defense, it has been altered a bit.  The front porch has been enlarged and the dormer removed.  I am getting better at spotting one of the tri-level models that Sears offered, The Concord, but this is the Homecrest design.  The first one I have ever seen!

Anyways……I didn’t spot it.  And probably never would have.  So thanks to Reed, for contacting me, offering to give me a tour of Monroe, and showing me the pages of his copy of the original blueprints for the home his family built in 1939.

IMG_6944

Homecrest catalog 1938

I found a photo of the house taken before the porch was changed on the Butler County Auditor’s website.

Sears Homecrest 629 Lebanon St Monroe auditor 2005

The house still has the original door on the connector from the house to the garage.

IMG_6960

Reed says the doorbell is original, too, on this door.  He remembers ringing it repeatedly as a child.    “TURN CRANK”

IMG_6961

I loved having the opportunity to scout out Monroe, and had a wonderful evening sharing my finds, and hearing from their residents about their houses.

I also got some new information about a house in Middletown that has been on my radar for a while.  I will share that in my next post.

Thanks for following along.

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A Shout Out to Monroe

It’s been a crazy busy, Sears House Hunting year for me so far.  Probably the best one yet.

It’s hard to believe that I was feeling a little burned out with this hobby a couple of years back, and thinking about finding something new to occupy my time.  Then……I remembered how much I love these houses, and realized that I probably just needed to find some new and different ways to be involved in the “big picture” part of this deal, which is to track down houses, and find more ways to promote awareness.

And I’ve done that this year by working harder at finding on line records, and then this Summer, making quite a few trips to new areas here in Ohio, with the focus on getting mortgage records.

Mortgage records lead to Sears Houses.  And sometimes, those Sears Houses lead to more Sears Houses……in the same neighborhoods, villages, and towns.  And while doing that, I’ve been blessed to see other great homes and buildings along the way.   And meet some really nice people.

Some of those really nice people showed up for a Presentation I was asked to give last week at a General Meeting of the Monroe Historical Society.

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The room was full, and the folks were so very interested in hearing me talk…. and talk….. and talk….. about Sears Houses.

And during and after, several people shared their own stories about Sears Houses.  Some had grown up in one, or lived in one at some point, or was living in one now!  Those stories make the whole thing come alive.  Houses from Sears, Roebuck, are part of our architectural history, but when you hear stories about the families that built or lived in one,  it becomes my own personal history.

So thanks, Monroe.  For asking me.  I had a blast!

 

 

 

 

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A Wardway Cranford in Marion

The hurrier I go, the behinder I get”  said the white rabbit in Lewis Carroll’s “Alice in Wonderland”.

Some days I can relate to that.

This has been a Summer of Sears House Hunting for me.  We took several weeks off from our work, and because of that, I’ve been trying to get out and about a least one day every week, to hunt down mortgage records and look for houses.

So……..because of that……..I am behind on labeling photos, actually looking for the houses that go along with the mortgage records I’ve found, and……sharing some of the houses I have found here on my little blog.

It’s a good problem to have, in this case, to be a little behind.

As I am based in Southeast Ohio, I am in the Sears, Roebuck laden area for kit houses.  On mortgage record research trips to small area Counties, I usually find several mortgages that lead me to Sears Homes, but zero, or maybe one, mortgage record for homes purchased from Montgomery Ward.

On a recent trip to Marion County, I did find that one occasional mortgage record for a Wardway Home.

Background info: Wardway Homes was the name used by  Montgomery Ward, who sold houses as kits through specialty mail order catalogs.  Sears, Roebuck started out selling house plans in 1908, and Montgomery Ward followed a year later, in 1909.

Montgomery Ward didn’t sell near as many homes as Sears, and discontinued that part of their business toward the end of 1931.  Sears stayed in the home selling business until 1942.

On Nov 24, 1930, a mortgage for $5,350 was issued to George A Hultz for two lots (8387 and 8388) in a plat with the crazy name “South-We Go”.

Now I have to tell you, I totally did not find the house when I went looking for it the day I got the mortgage record.  My Granddaughter and I drove around the block so many times trying to figure out which house it was, based on the plat map, that we were starting to get dirty looks from the neighbors working outside in their yards.

Here’s part of the plat map, with the two lots circled.

South We Go plat map Marion Ohio.png

 

When I looked at this plat map, I was pretty confident the house would be on Uncapher St., and that’s where we drove around and around and around again.  No house I could ID as being from Wardway.

We moved on.

Later that night, I pulled up the area on Google Maps, to see if maybe I had misinterpreted where the lot was.

I still don’t entirely understand how the plat map relates to the current Google Map, but by going back and forth between the maps and the Auditor’s website, I was able to find the correct lots.  Eventually.

Google Map of 954 Westwood Marion OH

A lot of things have changed in this little area in the last 90 years.  Here’s what the legal description for the house looks like now.

Auditor description 954 Westwood Marion

 

It’s no wonder I didn’t find the house when we were driving around and around and around the block……..because………it sits sideways on the lot!

At one time I’m sure it did face a street……or maybe the alley…….but no more.  And since I was driving, and looking at the houses facing the street, I missed it.

No matter.  I did find it, and went back the next day for my very own pictures of Ohio’s first ever located Wardway Cranford.

Wardway Cranford 954 Westwood Ave Marion OH 2 (Riordan)

Wardway Cranford, 954 Westwood Ave., Marion, Ohio

 

Now don’t let me lead you on.  Other researchers have located Wardway Cranford models through the years.  We currently have 32 Cranford models listed on our Wardway Homes list, but the majority of them (24) are in Michigan.  Apparently it was a very popular model up there.  I guess I need to look harder for them here in Ohio, because us Buckeyes don’t like it when Michigan wins.

Now that I have seen one “for real”, they should be easier for me to spot.

The Wardway Cranford is an odd combination of architectural styles, in my opinion.  From the front, it looks like an English Tudor.  The catalog showed the false front gable peak with half timbering over a four paned picture window.  What makes this odd is that the Cranford is a Dutch Colonial with a Gambrel style roof line.

Wardway Cranford image 1929

Here’s the side of the Cranford model in Marion that faces the street.  It’s clearly a Dutch Colonial from this angle.

Wardway Cranford 954 Westwood Ave Marion OH 4 (Riordan)

See that large evergreen tree on the right?  That’s what blocked my view of the front of the house when I was driving around and around and around the block.  ( That’s my story and I’m sticking to it. )

Wardway Cranford 954 Westwood Ave Marion OH 3 (Riordan)

Wardway Cranford, 954 Westwood Ave., Marion Ohio

 

I’m so glad to have located this Wardway Home in Marion.  I’ll be sharing a few more finds from my trip those two days.  Eventually.

Thanks for following along.

 

 

 

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The Sears No. 201 in Prospect

I hate skipping over all the houses we’ve located recently in Middletown, Reading, Sidney, and Wapakoneta……..but……..when something really special comes along…….this  gal’s got to share it.

No 264P201 image - 1914 catalog

The No 201 from the 1914 catalog

I’ve been wanting to go to Marion for a while now, to check for mortgage records, and do some looking around.  I’ve been there before, but not with the specific intent of tracking down Sears Houses.

The last time I was there, I was with my daughter and grandkids on a day trip to see the sites, like The Harding House and The Harding Memorial.  Both are eye candy.

This time, I had my granddaughter only in tow, as she has developed an interest in this crazy hobby of mine, and wanted to help with house hunting.

We started our day at the Marion County Recorder’s Office.  Thankfully, they had “real books” of mortgage indexes, and not just microfilm.  That makes the process so much quicker, in my opinion.

After a bit of trouble figuring out what books had the correct dates for Sears mortgages, we got started.  My granddaughter caught on to the process pretty quickly, but, like many kids these days, had a bit of trouble deciphering the old hand written records.  Some of the index books had been re-done and were typed, so she handled those.

While we didn’t find many mortgage records, 6 for Sears Roebuck, and 1 for Montgomery Ward, one of the mortgages was for a parcel in the village of Prospect.

After we got everything we needed, we grabbed a pizza at The Warehouse, then headed to another destination we had planned on…..

The Wyandot Popcorn Museum

You gotta go.  You just gotta.

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We had a great docent with loads of information on Marion’s history, and its connection to popcorn and Cracker Jacks, among other things.  The Museum is also home to the Marion County Historical Society.

Of course, we were given popcorn on our way out the door, so we had plenty of snacks for our trip home.  We already had a box with several slices of pizza!

We did drive around Marion a bit, but were unable to locate the one parcel that had a Montgomery Ward mortgage.  ( Don’t worry.  I found it later. )

The Sears mortgages were all Township legal descriptions outside of Marion city limits, so I knew those would require a bit of on line searching once I got home.

But…..we did have that one mortgage for Prospect.  We headed towards the village, since it was on our way home.

Prospect is a sweet little village of about 500 houses, and we had already kinda sorta figured out where the parcel was with the Sears mortgage attached, so it didn’t take us long to find it.

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Sears Berwyn, 701 North St., Prospect Ohio. Documented with a mortgage record.  Built reversed from the catalog illustration.

 

Sears Berwyn image 1930

 

I know.  I know.  Where’s the No. 201?

Well….we didn’t spy it on our quick drive around the village, and it was getting late in the afternoon, so we headed home.

OH!  I forgot to mention……I did already know a No. 201 had been built in Prospect.  Sears told us so in their 1914 catalog.

The No. 264P201 is a really long way of saying the No. 201.

No 201 in Prospect Ohio mention

I was disappointed we didn’t spot the house while we were there…..but……later that night, when other people in my house ( husband ) were watching TV,  I did what I do sometimes ( a lot of times ).  I looked for the house.  In this instance, I did that by working my way methodically through all the houses in Prospect on the Marion County Auditor’s website.  They have pictures.

AND…….I found it!!!

So……the next day……this gal’s birthday……said husband drove me back to Prospect to see it “for real” and get my very own photos.

And what a house!

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Sears No. 201, 708 Park Ave., Prospect Ohio

The house appears to be all original on the exterior.  The Auditor’s website states the year of build is 1912, which is probably correct, since we know Sears mentioned it in its 1914 catalog.

Wow.  100 hundred plus years old, and nobody has messed with it.

YAY!!!

Of course, after drooling for a bit, I took about 100 pictures.  Here’s a few.

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Sears No. 201, 708 Park Ave., Prospect Ohio

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Sears No. 201, 708 Park Ave., Prospect Ohio

The No. 201 was offered primarily in the years before Sears started their “Already Cut and Fitted” method of furnishing the framing lumber.  Since what you got had to be cut on site, the models in those early years tended to be more complicated.  This house has several angles, which you can see in the floor plan illustration.

No 264P201 floor plan - 1914 catalog

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Sears No. 201, 708 Park Ave., Prospect Ohio

 

After getting this close, I realized the house even has the original art glass windows included with this model.

 

 

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Sears No. 201, 708 Park Ave., Prospect Ohio

And those pillars!

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Sears No. 201, 708 Park Ave., Prospect Ohio

I’m in love with this house.  So much so, I am thinking of writing to the owner, and asking him to let me know if he ever wants to sell it.

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Sears No. 201, 708 Park Ave., Prospect Ohio

 

After hanging around a bit longer, we moved on.

As we were heading out, I spotted what could be another Sears House.  This one is The Uriel.

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Possible Sears Uriel, 505 Park Ave., Prospect Ohio

The house’s brackets and “notches” on the porch header aren’t what I have seen before on this model, so I’m not 100% sure.   Other than that, everything looks right.

Sears Uriel 1923 catalog

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Possible Sears Uriel, 505 Park Ave., Prospect Ohio

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Possible Sears Uriel, 505 Park Ave., Prospect Ohio

Another reason I am pretty sure The Uriel is the “real deal” from Sears, Roebuck, is that two doors down is what is most likely a house from a different mail order catalog company.

Aladdin Pomona 1919 catalog (1)

The Aladdin Company of Bay City, Michigan sold houses as kits for longer than Sears but is not as well known.  The Pomona was one of their most popular models, and is found frequently here in Ohio.

Aladdin Pomona 509 Park Ave Propsect OH right

Aladdin Pomona, 509 Park Ave., Prospect Ohio

This Pomona has been vinyl sided and has the front porch enclosed, but it still has a few of the original details.  You can see the stick work over the front porch in the next photo.  The porch pillars match as well, including the half one, which sometimes has had a support added over the years.

Aladdin Pomona 509 Park Ave Prospect OH

Aladdin Pomona, 509 Park Ave., Prospect Ohio

On the left side, several of the distinctive Aladdin brackets can be seen as well.  Those brackets are what caught my eye as we were driving past.

Aladdin Pomona 509 Park Ave Prospect OH left

Aladdin Pomona, 509 Park Ave., Prospect Ohio

We did go into Marion briefly as well, so I could get pictures of that Montgomery Ward house I mentioned earlier.  I’ll save that home for another post.

Thanks for following along.

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Sears House Hunters meet up – Day 3

If you’ve been following along, you know a few members of our Sears House research team had a meet up in the Cleveland area in June.

This post will focus on the third day, Sunday.

We didn’t get together on Sunday, since it was a travel day for all of us.  But we all did get to see some Sears Houses on our way back to our own parts of our Sears House Hunting world.

Judith decided on a quick trip up north to see the lake before she headed to the airport for her flight back to the St Louis area.  While she was up there she did a quick tour of Lakewood, and took this photo of a colorful Sears Honor.

Sears Honor 1524 Saint Charles Ave Lakewood OH 2 (JEC photo)

Sears Honor, 1524 Saint Charles Ave., Lakewood OH  ( Photo courtesy of Judith Chabot )

The Sears Honor in Lakewood sits on a corner lot, so if it looks like what we expect to be the front door is closed up, it is!  The owners are using the side of the house that faces the other street for the main entrance.

Sears Honor 1524 Saint Charles Ave Lakewood OH (JEC photo)

Side view of a Sears Honor in Lakewood, Ohio. This side is being used as the main entrance to the home. ( Photo courtesy of Judith Chabot )

 

image 1920

floor plan 1918

Andrew also stopped on his way home to Michigan to have a look at a few more houses in Elyria.  Unfortunately, due to a problem later in the week, he lost all the photos he took during our weekend outing.  Now he will have to go back to Elyria and get new photos soon.

RIGHT, ANDREW?!?!?

That leaves Marie and I.  We headed down south through Medina once again.  After a quick look at a few houses we already knew about, we decided to head towards Mansfield by way of Ashland.  We couldn’t get to Ashland on our way up on St Rt 42 due to water covering the road, but hoped it had cleared and was open by now.

Well……..we would never know for sure, because not too far south of Medina we came across a different road closure, and had to reroute again, heading east toward the Interstate.

So…..what do Sears House Hunters do when faced with such an issue?

Ha!  We look for Sears Houses somewhere else.

Like Wooster.

Since I hadn’t printed a list for Wooster for our weekend, Marie did a quick look at our on line database to see if we had any houses already identified there.

Yep!  On our way!

Almost as soon as we got to the edge of town, Marie spotted a Sears Crescent.  The house is being used as an insurance company office now, and since it was Sunday, we were able to pull in the parking lot and get photos easily.

Sears Crescent 2708 Cleveland Rd Wooster OH

Sears Crescent, 2708 Cleveland Rd., Wooster Ohio

Sears Crescent image 1925

We spotted a few more houses on Cleveland Rd. that need further review, then drove around a few blocks and spotted this lovely Sears Lewiston with a brick facade.

Sears Lewiston 430 Highland Wooster OH

Sears Lewiston , 430 Highland Ave., Wooster Ohio

Sears Lewiston image 1930

Then on we go to see a couple of houses already on “the list”.

It needs some love, but it is clearly a Sears Amsterdam.  Thanks to Lara for locating this one a while back.

Sears Amsterdam 1502 Beall St Wooster OH (2)

Sears Amsterdam, 1502 Beall St., Wooster Ohio

 

Sears Amsterdam 1502 Beall St Wooster OH door details

Distinctive door details on the Sears Amsterdam

Sears Amsterdam 1502 Beall St Wooster OH rear 2

Rear view of a Sears Amsterdam at 1502 Beall St., Wooster Ohio

Sears Amsterdam catalog 1926

Another house that has been on “the list” for so long we don’t even know who located it, is this Sears Belmont.   This was a common house design  that was offered by Sears and included in many plan books of the time, so documentation is really important when we see a house like this.  (This is true of many Sears House designs.)

Sears Belmont 1120 N Bever Wooster OH

Possible Sears Belmont, 1120 N Bever St., Wooster Ohio

Sears Belmont catalog 1931

Wooster has some great architecture, and we plan to go back to do some more looking around, and see if there are mortgage records available for our Sears House locating process.

Time is passing, and we’ve had a big weekend, so we decide to head out towards home, but still want to avoid the Interstate.

So…….where does that road take us?

Mount Vernon

Again, Marie checked “the list” for what had already been identified, and sees that Judith located a Sears Belmont there!

But……it’s the OTHER Sears Belmont.

Sears used the name Belmont twice during their house selling years, once for a lovely California style bungalow between 1916 and 1921, then for the brick English style home, shown above, in the early 1930’s.

Here’s the early one.

Sears Belmont image 1918

The house in Mount Vernon has the front porch enclosed, but it sure looks like the real deal.

Sears Belmont 109 Potwin St Mount Vernon OH right

Sears Belmont, 109 Potwin St., Mount Vernon Ohio

And while I was taking photos of the house above, Marie wandered off because she “saw something”.

Yep!  She sure did!

Right around the corner was this Sears Argyle.

Sears Argyle 102 Oak St Mount Vernon OH left 2

Sears Argyle, 102 Oak St., Mount Vernon Ohio

Argyle 1918 Image

Sears Argyle and Belmont Mount Vernon OH

By now, we really needed to make tracks for home, so we did.

What a great day we had in the Cleveland area, and what a great way to cap it off, by seeing more Sears Houses in Ohio on the way home.

Since our meet up in Cleveland, I have been out and about several times.  I went back to Middletown where I spotted a few more Sears Houses ( no surprise ), then spent a few hours in Reading another day.

A quick trip to Logan County to look for mortgage records netted a Wardway Home in Lakeview, then Marie and I did another day trip a bit north of us to Sidney and Wapakoneta.

Keep watching and……..

Thanks for following along!